The Internet of Things: What Will Come?

I know everyone would agree that the Internet of Things paradigm is rapidly becoming a part of the mainstream electronics culture, as more people are now adopting smart devices into their homes and offices. A technical visionary like me will definitely agree that there will be up to 21 billion connected devices to the internet by 2025. Like every other technical visionary, I believe that we are moving towards an era where IoT devices will be a huge part of how we interact with basic everyday objects.

 

View of Internet of Things by a technical visionary, Denis Bederov

 

From the perspective of a technical visionary, I like to define Internet of Things, or IoT for short, as a network made up of devices that connect to the Internet, synchronize and share data with each other. Beyond computers, laptops and smartphones, IoT devices also include “smart” devices and gadgets that have been equipped with chips to gather, share, and synchronize data over a network. Some of these “smart” devices include washing machines, robotic vacuum cleaners, door locks, toys, and toasters.

 

Like every other technical visionary, I am of the school of thought that the potential of Internet of Things is enormous and limitless. The ease and convenience that smart devices connected over an IoT network render is boundless. Some common usage is using smartphones to help users make a grocery list, or savings, like turning down the heat at home while they are away. This means that we can have smart homes, thermostats, and lighting systems that can all collect data on the user’s habits and patterns of usage. I believe that the more data IoT devices collect, the smarter they will become and the more convenience they offer.

 

Predictions about the Future Trends of IoT by Denis Bederov

 

From the perspective of a technical visionary, I believe that a lot of IoT trends are coming up almost every day. These trends are here to make life secure, easier, and more comfortable than before, so I have selected and described some interesting IoT trends.

 

Higher Consumer Adoption:

 

As a hopeful technical visionary, I see the prospects that in the next decade, we will get to see a huge shift of IoT away from the usual consumer-based IoT. As the funding of the consumer-based IoT decreases, the future trends will usher in the industrial IoT infrastructure and platform. The only thing is that these IoT trends may actually require time to completely evolve, but most definitely will solve the difficulties in insurance, transportation, agriculture or telecommunication, and ultimately reduce the capital expense.

 

More “Smart” Devices:

 

As I earlier stated, individual consumers will no longer be the only ones using IoT devices. I see the trends pointing towards a growth in the number of cities and companies adopting smart technologies to save time and money. Through the use of IoT connected devices, I believe that we can have “smart” cities with smart traffic lights that collect traffic data, which can be used to sync lights during peak traffic times.

 

The “smart” cities paradigm implies that there will be cities that will be able to centrally automate, remotely manage, and collect data through different objects like visitor kiosks, video camera surveillance systems, and even taxis.  Powering responsive cities with IoT will help solve traffic congestion issues, unlock sustainable development, improve overall efficiency, improve safety, and ultimately save the government money by reducing the running cost.

 

More Dangerous Forms of IoT-based DDoS Attacks:

 

The world witnessed first occurrence of IoT-based malware in 2016. It was strain of malicious software that can infect connected devices such as security cameras. I have read about Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks that have used infected IoT devices to hack and shut down websites.

 

A more shocking revelation is that IoT devices can also be used to direct other attacks, and there are speculations that IoT devices can be weaponized, such as a country shutting down home thermostats in an enemy state during the lowest temperatures.

 

Final Words from Denis Bederov

 

Even though many people are concerned with security and privacy challenges that IoT presents, I believe that these challenges will inspire more legislative and regulatory measures. For example, the European Union implemented the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) mid-2018, and this has motivated similar security and privacy initiatives in the United States and in several other nations around the world. That means users can have more control over their data and privacy.

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